Jane Cheetham - RE/MAX Acclaim



Posted by Jane Cheetham on 9/19/2017

Moving to a new home is difficult for everyone. Children, pets, not even you are immune to the stresses of adjusting to a new life. But moving can also be a great experience. They can help a family grow closer together, discover new interests and hobbies, and create new memories together.

In this article, we’re going to give you some moving tips that will help you and your family make the most of your decision to relocate, and maybe give you a new optimism to endure the stressful process of moving.

Making a move easier on your pets

When our pets are sick or upset it can be heartbreaking for us. We can’t use our words to explain that everything will be okay. Generally, pets are resilient and can often adapt easily to a new environment. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try to help make it easier for them.

To introduce your pet to their new home, take them for a visit before the move, if possible. Let them sniff around for a while and get comfortable with the place, assuring them that there is no danger there.

On moving day, have your pet stay with a relative or pet-sitter for the day so they don’t get lost or trampled on during the hectic moving process.

Once you’re all moved in, let your pet explore the new home freely, making sure their toys, bedding, or litter box are all within their reach.

Helping kids cope with a move

A move can be particularly stressful for children. Oftentimes moving homes means changing schools, leaving old friends and making new ones.

Before you even begin looking at homes, try to get your child involved in the process so they don’t feel powerless. Encourage them by showing them fun things to do in their new town, like nice parks or their favorite stores. Get them involved in planning out their new room, like how it will be painted and decorated.

In terms of school, try to time your move so that your child can make some friends before the school year begins. Plus, explain to them how easy it is to stay in touch with old friends through email, Facebook, or whatever method is appropriate for their age. Find out if there are children in your new neighborhood, or a club or sport that your child can join to help them make new friends.

Don’t neglect your own anxiety

While it’s important to help our family deal with the new move, it’s also vital to take care of our own needs. Make sure you spend time on your own interests and try to avoid isolating yourself from others during this stressful time.

If you’re starting a new job, take note of whether or not you’re bringing that stress home with you and try to set aside time for yourself to do the things you like to help you unwind. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed, be sure to reach out to your spouse, a friend, and/or a counselor.

If you and your family take the time to help each other, there’s no reason you shouldn’t have a fun move and enjoy your new home together.







Tags: moving tips   moving   pets   family   children  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Jane Cheetham on 7/19/2016

Elderly careThere comes a time when families start to think about senior members moving. Factors such as retirement, finances, lifestyle, health or the distance between family members are just a few of the reasons why seniors may decide to relocate. Moving is a big decision especially when a senior has lived in one place for a very long time. Many things must be considered, including access to health care, recreation, social activities and practical concerns, such as grocery stores, libraries, climate, etc. Access to Quality Care For many seniors access to health care or options for health care assistance is the primary reason for moving. When considering options it is important look at the short-term solutions, but also consider long term scenarios. Options may include drop-in help, moving closer to a family member that can assist when needed or retirement communities that offer fully independent living to supportive assistance as required. Community Services It is also important to research the area community services. You will want to make note of services such as homecare, cleaning services, snow removal, transportation and home repair. Some individuals may want access to volunteer organizations or senior centers where they can be involved in the community. Support As an older adult, moving is an especially difficult transition. Finding the support the senior needs in the new community is imperative. Groups that seniors can connect with will help the transition go smoother. Connect with church groups, home visit solutions or perhaps meetings that would be conducted in a home setting. Here are some websites that may help you in your transition: •Eldercare LocatorAARPElder Web: Online Eldercare SourcebookAmerican Society on Aging (ASA)Senior Resource Housing: Information on Housing Options





Posted by Jane Cheetham on 7/21/2015

Friendly Moving CompanyIf you've never heard of a moving scam, then consider yourself lucky. But many people across America are falling victim to these scams. Moving scammers have a multitude of ways that they can take advantage of you. The main scam seems to be packing all of your household items into their truck, and then adding on exorbitant additional fees in transit, effectively holding your items hostage until you pay up. Less popular scams involve unlicensed movers posing as legitimate companies, by-the-hour rates where you are charged even while no work is being done, and in the rare case, a sham company showing up, packing up all of your possessions, and driving away, never to be heard from again. To minimize your risk, follow a few simple guidelines.

  • Use a local, reputable business.
  • Never do business with a broker. Always do business with the actual moving company.
  • Always be sure that the company is licensed to do the work they are to be performing. This includes getting the business's full name and address, motor carrier (MC) and Department of Transportation (DOT) license numbers, phone numbers and an e-mail address. If a company cannot provide you access to these things, then move on.
  • Be sure to use a company with actual employees, and not day laborers. If they use day laborers, there is a chance that they may not have the proper insurance in place.
Additionally, be sure to get any estimates in paper form. They are legally obligated to do so, and if they balk at the idea, then it's time for you to move on, and find a company that will play by the rules.