Jane Cheetham - RE/MAX Acclaim



Posted by Jane Cheetham on 10/31/2017

Buying a house comes with challenges. Finding a reputable lender who will be in business throughout the life of your loan is among those challenges. To find a reputable lender, it's important to pay attention to your gut. It's also important to get to know financial institutions before you enter into a contract that could be binding for up to 30 years. Ease of account access, trust, secure payment methods and open communication are key features that a reliable lender brings to the table.

Your most trusting financial relationship might be right under your nose

Trust may be one of the biggest factors that determines whether a lender and you enter into a mortgage agreement. If you currently have a bank account, you may have already developed the level of trust that you need with a solvent lender. But,whether that trust will yield a mortgage that saves you big while profiting your lender at the same time depends on several factors.

Banks are direct lenders, potentially saving you third parties fees. Take out a mortgage through your local bank and you won't have to get familiar with a third party financial institution to finalize your mortgage or submit monthly payments.Additional benefits that are associated with a home loan through your local bank include:

  • Established relationships - If employee turnover at your local bank is low, you might have been transacting and communicating with bank managers who will review your mortgage application for several years.
  • Ability to combine debts and accounts - You could save on fees simply because the bank bundles your mortgage with an auto loan and a student loan or a small business loan that you took out before you bought your new house.
  • Lower interest rates - This isn't a given. Ask about interest rate deals that the bank is offering on first or second mortgages. Because you already frequent the bank, there's a good chance that you're already aware of existing and upcoming mortgage deals that the lender is running.
  • Nearby locations - Since you currently do business with the bank, you know where branches are. You won't have to hunt fora branch that's close to where you live or work.
  • Bank operation knowledge - No one has to teach you how to make online or in-person deposits, withdrawals or payments. You also know how long it generally takes for checks to clear at the bank.
  • Single point of contact - Take out a mortgage with your local bank and you won't have to open and manage another account to make your mortgage payments.

Get a mortgage through your local bank and you could reap the same benefits that lenders seek from their customers. That benefit is a loyal relationship with someone who you trust. To gain the most from the relationship, enter a mortgage agreement with your local bank when the bank is running a mortgage interest discount special. And take advantage of customer loyalty deals.




Tags: Mortgage   mortgagge   bank  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Jane Cheetham on 6/13/2017

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers multiple housing assistance programs for people hoping to achieve home ownership.

In spite of being offered by the USDA, you don’t need to be a farmer or rancher of any kind to qualify for a home loan. Similarly, you don’t have to buy a home miles from civilization--many popular, thickly-settled suburbs across the country also qualify for USDA programs.

In this article, we’re going to explain the different programs offered by the USDA, how to check your eligibility, how to find out which locations qualify, and how to get started with a loan.

USDA Assistance Programs

The USDA offers two types of home loans for prospective buyers. The direct program, or Section 502 Direct Loan Program, is designed to help low-income persons to acquire safe, affordable housing. The assistance for this loan comes in the form of a subsidy that can be applied directly to the applicant’s mortgage, reducing monthly mortgage payments for a certain period of time.

Another type of home loan offered by the USDA is the Single Family Home Guarantee. Much like an FHA or first-time homeowner’s loan, this type of mortgage is insured by the government. As a result, buyers can often qualify for lower interest rates and smaller down payments from their lenders.

Guarantees may be applied towards the purchase, rebuilding, or building of a rural home as an incentive to developing rural areas. Later, we’ll talk about what is considered “rural.”

Outside of help with buying homes, the USDA also provides grants and loans for repairing and modernizing rural homes.

Who is eligible for USDA mortgage assistance?

In general, those applying for USDA assistance must meet certain criteria. Applicants must meet income eligibility, be a U.S. citizen or qualified noncitizen, and must purchase a qualifying property.

For the Direct loan program, applicants must be without safe or sanitary housing and be unable to secure housing through other means. Whereas for USDA guaranteed loans, applicants need only fall under the maximum income limit.

To find out if you’re eligible immediately, fill out an eligibility form from the USDA.

How do I know which houses qualify?

Generally speaking, homes located within large, metropolitan cities won’t qualify for USDA loans. However, suburbs just outside of some larger cities often do. For example, towns located just a half hour’s drive outside of Boston have a good chance of being eligible.

To view the map of property eligibility, simply fill out the online eligibility form.

How Do I Get Started?

If you’re seeking a direct loan, you’ll have to contact your local Rural Development office. Applications for a direct loan are accepted year-round and are awarded based on funding availability.

For people looking for a private loan guaranteed by the USDA, applicants should contact an approved lender in the area. The lender will then work with the USDA loan specialist in your state.




Tags: Mortgage   home loans   USDA Loans  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Jane Cheetham on 11/15/2016

At a glance, buying a home seems like a daunting and complicated process. If it's your first time buying a home you're probably hearing a lot of terms that don't mean much to you like "rate commitment," "prequalify," and an array of acronyms that no one has ever really explained like APR and ARM. What many first time homebuyers don't realize is that the mortgage application process is relatively straightforward. It's a way for lenders to determine if they will lend money to the homebuyer. The lender will require some documentation on your part and you'll want to do your homework when it comes to choosing the right mortgage for you, but if you're confused about where to begin, here's everything you need to know about the home mortgage application process.

Gather your documents

Each lender will be slightly different when it comes to what records and documents they require from you. In general, lenders will require two years of work history, proof of income, and tax papers. They will also ask for your permission to run a credit check. Some things you should bring when applying for a mortgage include:
  • Your most recent pay stubs (at least two)
  • Your most recent W-2 forms
  • Completed tax returns
  • Bank statements
  • Gift letters
  • Debt - credit cards, student loans, etc.

Filling out the application

The actual application for the mortgage is pretty simple. Be expected to provide your personal and marital information, as well as your social security number. When you apply for a loan you'll also be determining if you're applying singly or with another person, such as a spouse. Some people apply jointly to seek a higher loan amount. However, you should be aware that if this is your plan of action the lender will require income and credit information from both of you. Keep in mind that it isn't easy to remove one person from a home loan once the contract is signed, so you should make certain of this decision before applying jointly.

Locked-in interest rates

It won't come as a surprise to you that, like in other industries, interest rates on mortgages fluctuate. For this reason, many home buyers attempt to "lock-in" their interest rate, meaning the lender is no longer allowed to change the interest rate after signing. The benefit of locking in your interest is that it can avoid having your interest rate raised before you sign on the home. The disadvantage is that since rates fluctuate, you could miss out on a lower one. This is also the difference between APR (annual percentage rating) and ARM (adjustable rate mortgage). With an APR, the cost of borrowing money (interest) is fixed. For an ARM, the interest rate can increase, decrease, or stay the same at different points in the repayment process.

Refinancing

Your financial situation is bound to fluctuate throughout your life, hopefully for the better. At some point down the road, it might make sense to refinance on your mortgage. Essentially this means you are agreeing to change the details of the mortgage to either accept a different interest rate or to alter the length of the loan term. Refinancing usually involves fees, however, so you don't want to rely on it too heavily as a fallback.





Posted by Jane Cheetham on 10/11/2016

Are you looking to buy a bigger home? If you are looking to make the move a jumbo mortgage might be right for you. A jumbo mortgage is a home loan with an amount that exceeds conforming loan limits set by the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight (OFHEO) or better known as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Currently, the loan limit is $417,000 in most parts of the United States, but can increase to $625,500 in the higher cost areas. OFHEO sets the conforming loan limit size on an annual basis. Jumbo loans have slightly higher interest rates because they carry more credit risk.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Jane Cheetham on 8/23/2016

When it comes to mortgages there is a lot to know and a lot of choices. One loan that was popular before the housing crisis was the interest-only loan. An interest-only loan is an adjustable-rate loan with an initial fixed period when only interest is due. They are typically available in 5-, 7- or 10-year terms. Economists blame interest-only loans for the foreclosure crisis citing they were issued too freely. Today, interest-only loans are more difficult to obtain. Borrowers were using interest-only loans to qualify for a more expensive home and when the interest-only term ended the payment went up leaving many homeowners unable to afford the mortgage payment. Interest-only loans are now being used by wealthy borrowers as a financial tool to help them manage irregular cash flow, reap a tax benefit, or free up cash for investment elsewhere. Lenders that offer interest-only loans have strict qualifying standards. They generally require 30 percent equity in a property, and a minimum FICO score of 720. Lenders also look at the ability to pay back the loan is based on the fully amortized payment, not the interest-only payment.